Posts Tagged ‘Bubble Yum’

70’s Hair Gone Wild

The up do, the down do, the Farrah do. When you think of 70’s hairstyles, the Farrah “flip” is probably the first style that comes to mind. And with good reason; the Farrah Flip was a cultural phenomenon that promoted itself weekly on our ‘boob-tubes’, thanks to a certain TV show. Even if you didn’t watch Charlie’s Angels, you knew about the Farrah Flip.
But with all the feathered hype, a very 70’s hairstyle was quickly forgotten – the “Dorothy Hamill”.

Yup, before Farrah there was Dorothy Hamill, complete with a supremely cute, subtle ‘feather’ cut. Short, sassy, easily maintained, the Dorothy Hamil was a precursor to the extreme feather Jill Munroe sported on Charlie’s Angels. Of course, now we call Dorothy’s cut a ‘wedge’ cut, but let’s be honest here – it WAS feathered. In fact, I do believe that most 8th grade boys sported this look in the 70’s. Shaun Cassidy comes to mind, and even better, his brother. Nothing to be ashamed of boys – Dorothy Hamill DID win a gold medal at the Olympics, after all.

I Loved Chuck

Ever wonder what young, bored in suburbia girls REALLY did in class? They might have looked like they were dutifully taking notes on the days topics, but what they were earnestly concentrating on was writing the name of their one and only true love, over & over & over & over . . .you get the idea.

And in this case of MY one and only true love, it was Chuck, as you can see by my binder ramblings. I actually have at least three pages of the same thing, “I Love Chuck” written so many times I HAD to have run out of ink at some point. Funny thing about Chuck – he was one of three, a triplet. Yup, there were three Chucks, so to speak. Why all the girls seemed to fall for only him, way back when we were all 13, I can’t explain. But damn, did he have it good! I think we all loved Chuck.

Feathered Hair

 

Wrangler Jeans and feathered hair. Serious situations that describe my not-so-serious life, back in the late 1970’s. Oh, yes, the feathered hair meant so much back then. My hair, the boys’ hair. Feathered. If the boy could flip that feathered hair, even better. Seriously – I think the boys had the better feather! Us girls would spend WAY too much time getting that flip just right; boys seemed to just have it without trying. Did they use gel? Did they use mouse? Hey, guys, we HATED you for that!!! Case in point: my saidies date has THE BEST FEATHER EVER, and I spent at least 45 minutes trying to get my feather oh-so-perfect, his looks so natural. Then again, I have no way of knowing how long my date actually spent getting that flip. Hey, John, how long DID it take you to get that perfect flip?

Advertising Made Simple

Ahh, Bubble Yum and the Compact SuperCurl. Two of my favorite things back in 1977. I remember getting the SuperCurl for Christmas – wow was I on cloud nine! It’s interesting to me, looking back on old ads from the 1970s, how simple they were and yet they did the trick oh-so-well.  Not alot of bells and whistles and I still would covet anything these ads were pushing my way – even as a young kid. Of course, there weren’t as many products or as many companies pushing a multitude of items. It was a much simpler time for advertising competition.  You had a few department stores and a handfull of drug stores veying for your hard-earned bucks. Sears, JC Penny’s, Macys, K Mart, Emporium. TG & Y, Payless Drug Stores.  Christmas shopping was EASY back then. Now, it’s a frantic mess of store hopping in hopes of getting just a few presents on Santa’s list. The Big Box Stores have alot, but not necessarily everything. Gaming stores, home improvement stores, linen stores, book stores, online stores – I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed! And I’m longing for the days when all I wanted for Christmas was a clock radio. Or a SuperCurl Compact Curling Iron!

Bored in Suburbia

The Great American Novel Part II

Seriously, what else were bored kids in suburbia to do during the summer? There was only one mall, and it was a small one at that. We had “free swim” at the local high school during the day, the rope swing in the creek, and boring, hot summer nights to get into trouble. And boy did we try our best to get into trouble. I could say that I was influenced by my older brother to be the vandal that I inevitably became, but that would be a lie. I think I influenced HIM to be a vandal. Being a rebel felt liberating. Doing ‘bad things’ felt good. And the fun that ensued was only the tip of the rebel life I was sliding into – I can look back on it now and say “aha! THAT’S were it started!” but at the time, I had no idea WHAT I had started.


1970’s Teenager in Suburbia

What was suburbia really like for a teenage girl in the 1970’s? In a word, sheltered. Although my friends and myself liked to think of ourselves as rebels, we were really just bored teens looking for a bit of fun in a largely unexciting environment. While urban areas were bustling with disco, punk rock and gender bending explorations, suburbia was asleep with banal shopping malls, 3 channels for your TV viewing pleasure and shag carpets.

At times a bit of the real world did edge its way into our quiet neighborhood. I remember hints to the Watergate scandal (my dads’ ever-increasing bad mood and outbursts of profanity while watching the evening news), the gas crisis (we bought a compact, gas saving foreign car, much to my dads’ dismay) and the ominous shadow of nuclear power plants melting down, thanks to the accident at Three Mile Island. But all of this was so far removed from my teen-aged concerns. Boys, Bubblicious, Loves Baby Soft and 8-track tapes were foremost on my mind.

I Love my Diary Part 2

The exciting life of a 12 year old. We were the epitome of delinquents. We were the vandals – toilet papering your house, shoplifting Bubble Yum, egging on-coming cars in the neighborhood. We were, well – BORED. Boredom and hormones made for such drama!
I seriously can’t read half of this – and it’s from my own diary! From what I can gather, we were egging EACH OTHER??? Wow, now that’s boredom at its finest . . .